NUCFAC Data Collection

  • Neighborhoods

    Tree-planting neighborhoods: In each city, we randomly selected 25 neighborhoods that had a tree-planting project of 20 or more trees between 2009 and 2011.

    Comparison neighborhoods: In each city, we selected a matched comparison group of 25 neighborhoods that did not have a tree-planting project between 2009-2011.

  • Trees

    In each selected tree-planting neighborhood, citizen scientists (interns, volunteers, or students recruited by the nonprofit and trained by key NUCFAC project personnel) re-inventoried 50 percent or 100 percent of planted trees (depending on the total number of trees planted in each neighborhood and the time allotted for data collection by each nonprofit).

    Data Collection Instrument: Planted Tree Re-Inventory Protocol:

    Gather data about trees in selected neighborhoods on tree-level variables, local environmental variables, management variables, and social or community variables.

    See our article in Cities and the Environment that describes Protocol development:

    See the full protocol 

    • Suggested Protocol citation: Vogt JM, Mincey SK, Fischer BC, Patterson M (2014) Planted Tree Re-Inventory Protocol, Version 1.1. Bloomington, IN: Bloomington Urban Forest Research Group at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change, Indiana University. 96 pp.
  • Neighborhood Residents

    In both tree-planting and comparison neighborhoods, we surveyed a random sample of individuals that live in the neighborhood. Where data were available, we also surveyed individuals in tree-planting neighborhoods that participated in tree planting/care.

    Data Collection Instrument: Survey:

    A questionnaire was mailed to individuals in tree-planting and comparison neighborhoods. We asked questions about neighborhood collective activities, social cohesion and trust, individual environmental and tree knowledge, as well as (for tree planting neighborhoods) the individual’s participation in tree planting and evaluation of perceived/observed outcomes the tree-planting project.

    See the full survey

    Suggested survey citation: Bloomington Urban Forestry Research Group (2014) Resident Survey to Assess Neighborhood Social Characteristics and Tree Planting Outcomes. Bloomington, IN: Bloomington Urban Forest Research Group at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change, Indiana University. 8 pp. Last updated March 5, 2014.

  • Neighborhood and Nonprofit Leaders

    In all neighborhoods, we contacted and attempted to interview a neighborhood leader (i.e., Homeowners or Neighborhood Association presidents, etc.). In tree-planting neighborhoods, we also contacted and attempted to interview the neighborhood leader of the tree-planting project. We employed and trained local graduate students in the social sciences (e.g., anthropology, sociology, social work, etc.) in each city to interview these leaders about the collective activities in the neighborhood, general neighborhood characteristics, and, when applicable, their experience with tree-planting projects in the neighborhood.

    Data Collection Instrument: Semi-Structured Interview Protocol:

    An in-person interview was conducted using the following interview schedule. All interviews were, with the interviewee’s permission, recorded and later transcribed.

    See the full neighborhood interview instrument

    Suggested instrument citation:
    • Bloomington Urban Forestry Research Group (2014) Interview Script for Neighborhood Leaders and Tree Planting Project Leaders, originally developed for use with the “Evaluating the Ecological and Social Outcomes of Neighborhood and Nonprofit Urban Forestry: NUCFAC Grant” project. Bloomington, IN: Bloomington Urban Forest Research Group at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change, Indiana University. 8 pp. Last updated May 21, 2014.

    Key NUCFAC project personnel interviewed all individuals involved in tree-planting activities employed by each partner nonprofit organization about the practices they use in the tree-planting program or programs implemented by their organization.

    Data Collection Instrument: Semi-Structured Interview Protocol: 

    Over the phone interviews were conducted using the following interview schedule. All interviews were, with the interviewee’s permission, recorded and later transcribed.

    See the full nonprofit interview instrument

    Suggested instrument citation:

    Bloomington Urban Forestry Research Group (2014) Interview Script for Nonprofit Employees Involved in Neighborhood Tree Planting, originally developed for use with the “Evaluating the Ecological and Social Outcomes of Neighborhood and Nonprofit Urban Forestry: NUCFAC Grant” project.Bloomington, IN: Bloomington Urban Forest Research Group at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change, Indiana University. 8 pp. Last updated April 9, 2014.

  • Secondary Project: Impact of Tree Data Collectors

    As a secondary objective of this project, we collected data that can be used to evaluate the outcomes of participation in data collection activities on the minimally-trained volunteers, students, and interns that collected tree data for our project as citizen scientists:

    Data Collection Instrument: Survey: 

    A questionnaire was administered to all individuals who participated in the tree data collection team training. The same questionnaire was given before the training and again at the end of data collection.

    See the full data collector survey

    Suggested instrument citation:

    • Bloomington Urban Forestry Research Group (2014) Individual Survey to Assess the Impacts of Participation in Data Collection Activities, originally developed for use with the “Evaluating the Ecological and Social Outcomes of Neighborhood and Nonprofit Urban Forestry: NUCFAC Grant” project.Bloomington, IN: Bloomington Urban Forest Research Group at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change, Indiana University. 8 pp. Last updated May 22, 2014.

     See also the full Research Design available below:

    •  Watkins S.L., S.K. Mincey, J.M. Vogt, R. Bergmann, and B.C. Fischer. 2013. A research design for evaluating the outcomes of neighborhood and nonprofit urban forestry. Workshop Colloquia presentation at The Vincent and Elinor Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, April 17, 2013, Bloomington, IN. Working Paper available (Presentation and Working Paper)